Just heading a ball can cause concussion – and drives up risk of Alzheimer’s in later life

Players who head the ball are 3 times more likely to be concussed than others
The study by US scientists dispels the idea that most football head injuries come from clashes of heads or clattering against the goal post
It comes weeks after a study showed a link between concussion and Alzheimer’s

Heading the ball during a football match could cause head injuries including concussion and loss of consciousness, research suggests.
It comes weeks after a study revealed even low impact injuries like a concussion can increase one’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Scientists in the US have found footballers who head the ball the most were three times more likely to suffer concussion than those who rarely head the ball.
Symptoms varied from moderate pain and dizziness to blacking out.
The new study, published in the Neurology medical journal, reveals simply heading the ball is more likely to lead to injury which increase one’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease
Experts have previously assumed most head injuries during football matches were caused by clashes of heads or clattering against the goal post.
But the new study, published last night in the Neurology medical journal, reveals simply heading the ball is more likely to lead to injury.
The study, in which 222 amateur footballers from New York were tracked for a fortnight of training and competitive matches, only examined the short-term impact of such head injuries.
But the scientists said the findings raised concerns about the likelihood of long-term damage.
Campaigners have warned for some years that heading the ball might increase the risk of neurological disorders including dementia.

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